Saturday, June 21, 2008

Here I go, all Judgey Judging

Please, will someone explain to me the phenomenon of "upgrading" to a new, larger house when a family hasn't grown out of the one they already have?

I just do not get this. Is it because I am a homebody who detests packing and moving?

And why do I get so annoyed when I hear of ward members who are planning to do this thing? Why do I give a flying fig what decisions other people make?

And why am I blogging about it in public so everyone will know how judgemental I am?

4 comments:

dukdub said...

Lets see; you want a bigger home, you want a 10 acre farm, you need to reread that book.

I want a classic 1955 Studebaker Speedster to pull my classic 1947 GarWood boat around to all the boat shows. I want people to SEE ME! I need to reread that book!

That's OK Lisa, it's hard to keep our sights high without envy creeping in. I Love You anyway.

Lisa said...

Thing is, I don't want a bigger home. I love my house and think it fits our family perfectly. I want more land, yes, but I don't want to go deep into debt to get it, which is why we don't have it.

jen said...

You know, I think I was that way years ago and then I got older and hopefully wiser. :) A bigger house means more to clean, more taxes to pay, more bugs to spray, more grass to mow, more flower beds to weed, more windows to wash and an increase in my stewardship. Frankly, my stewardship is at it's peak already so no bigger house for me. :) Besides the fact that we just moved and it was hard. I even told Dave that we were never moving again because it is just too darn much work. :)

dukdub said...

Yes, Lisa, I look at the men who trade in their pickups and cars each year or so, and I think, "why waste so much money?" I know you are happy with your home, and I am happy with a new car each 10 years, and you just have to scratch your head and wonder why do they want more debt? Why don't they want more money earning interest? I read a thing where a Rolex watch would reduce your retirement portfolio (over 30 years, you know, a young man) by $70 or $80k.